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...stuff Sylvar wants to share with you

  • 1st November
    2012
  • 01
Gawker.com

gawkercom:

An unlikely star was born at some of New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s post-hurricane press conferences: sign language interpreter Lydia Callis. Everyone from NPR to New York magazine to Gawker’s own Max Read has been singing Callis’ praises since she stepped up and, with her boisterous American Sign Language routine, served as a spot of sunshine in an otherwise horribly dim time.

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  • 18th September
    2012
  • 18
Sign language that African Americans use is different from that of whites

Carolyn McCaskill remembers exactly when she discovered that she couldn’t understand white people. It was 1968, she was 15 years old, and she and nine other deaf black students had just enrolled in an integrated school for the deaf in Talledega, Ala.

When the teacher got up to address the class, McCaskill was lost.

“I was dumbfounded,” McCaskill recalls through an interpreter. “I was like, ‘What in the world is going on?’ ”

The teacher’s quicksilver hand movements looked little like the sign language McCaskill had grown up using at home with her two deaf siblings and had practiced at the Alabama School for the Negro Deaf and Blind, just a few miles away. It wasn’t a simple matter of people at the new school using unfamiliar vocabularly; they made hand movements for everyday words that looked foreign to McCaskill and her fellow black students.

So, McCaskill says, “I put my signs aside.” She learned entirely new signs for such common nouns as “shoe” and “school.” She began to communicate words such as “why” and “don’t know” with one hand instead of two as she and her black friends had always done. She copied the white students who lowered their hands to make the signs for “what for” and “know” closer to their chins than to their foreheads. And she imitated the way white students mouthed words at the same time as they made manual signs for them.

Whenever she went home, McCaskill carefully switched back to her old way of communicating…

  • 22nd May
    2012
  • 22
Girls With Slingshots, 2012-05-14: guest strip by Victoria Lee Panos
PANEL 1:
[Scene: the Wrecking Bar.]
Maureen: [spoken] Hi, guys!
Jamie: [spoken] Maureen! Melody! I didn’t think you guys were coming!
Maureen: [spoken] Well, I wasn’t planning to, but Melody dragged me out.
Hazel: [spoken] I don’t get it. Why would a deaf person want to go clubbing?
PANEL 2:
Melody: [written on a notepad] I love dancing! Most clubs play music loud enough for me to feel the vibrations.
Jamie: [spoken] Neat!
PANEL 3:
Melody: [signed] Let me guess: this song is about a girl he wants to **** and ****.
Maureen: [signed] It’s actually worse!
Thea: [spoken, cupping her hand to her ear] I WISH I’D THOUGHT TO BRING EARPLUGS. [Most of this text is covered by large letters DNND representing the loud music.]
Mimi: [spoken, cupping her hand to her ear] WHAT?
PANEL 4:
Erin: [spoken] DO YOU WANT [the rest of her question is obscured by the music, NNTS NNTS NNTS]
Jamie: [spoken, cupping her hand to her ear] WHAT?
Melody: [signed] I’m going for a drink. Want one?
Maureen: [signed] Maybe an iced tea.
PANEL 5:
[In the background, Hazel is screaming something over the music.]
Maureen: [signed] I think the group’s ready to head out.
PANEL 6:
[outside the club]
Thea: [spoken] Ugh. My head is pounding.
Mimi: [spoken] Mine, too.
Jamie: [spoken] I hope nobody expects me to talk tomorrow.
Hazel: [shouted] WHAAT?
Melody: [signed] I don’t get it. Why would a hearing person want to go clubbing?

Girls With Slingshots, 2012-05-14: guest strip by Victoria Lee Panos

PANEL 1:

[Scene: the Wrecking Bar.]

Maureen: [spoken] Hi, guys!

Jamie: [spoken] Maureen! Melody! I didn’t think you guys were coming!

Maureen: [spoken] Well, I wasn’t planning to, but Melody dragged me out.

Hazel: [spoken] I don’t get it. Why would a deaf person want to go clubbing?

PANEL 2:

Melody: [written on a notepad] I love dancing! Most clubs play music loud enough for me to feel the vibrations.

Jamie: [spoken] Neat!

PANEL 3:

Melody: [signed] Let me guess: this song is about a girl he wants to **** and ****.

Maureen: [signed] It’s actually worse!

Thea: [spoken, cupping her hand to her ear] I WISH I’D THOUGHT TO BRING EARPLUGS. [Most of this text is covered by large letters DNND representing the loud music.]

Mimi: [spoken, cupping her hand to her ear] WHAT?

PANEL 4:

Erin: [spoken] DO YOU WANT [the rest of her question is obscured by the music, NNTS NNTS NNTS]

Jamie: [spoken, cupping her hand to her ear] WHAT?

Melody: [signed] I’m going for a drink. Want one?

Maureen: [signed] Maybe an iced tea.

PANEL 5:

[In the background, Hazel is screaming something over the music.]

Maureen: [signed] I think the group’s ready to head out.

PANEL 6:

[outside the club]

Thea: [spoken] Ugh. My head is pounding.

Mimi: [spoken] Mine, too.

Jamie: [spoken] I hope nobody expects me to talk tomorrow.

Hazel: [shouted] WHAAT?

Melody: [signed] I don’t get it. Why would a hearing person want to go clubbing?